fare

5348483_orig.jpg
This is as good a time as any to explain some of the different culinary terms. Whereas one of the dandified lackwits that we term “gourmets” might say, “Grilled trout, basil and potato crusted, with a sour apple and spicy lime chutney,” the housemaster of a Lastfolk skaether would describe the same dish as, “Fireseared slake under a shield of basil-shot potato, flanked with a ladle of sour apple and spiced lime chopped-sauce.” (A “shield” with no mention of its making is always a pastry crust, such as is found over a steak-and-kidney pie.) The modern-day menu description “Seared venison stuffed with smoked whitefish and wild mushrooms, all topped with a juniper berry and ice wine reduction” would become “Flamed venison stuffed with smoked silverfin and goldenpanned browncaps, doused with a simmer of juniper berry and zzar.” (“Goldenpanned is the equivalant of sauteed. While I am about it, I might as well give you some quick nomenclature for raw materials. Lastfolk use the same names for the meat of almost all edible beasts, although vasark is horsemeat.
The most common fish of the table is silverfin (any whitefish), bluefin (tuna), sheelie (bass), burslake or more often simply slake (trout), navalar (catfish), shaelings (tiny silver minnows), and sorn.
Of groundfowl, grouse are “blusterwing” (both singular and plural), turkeys are “bustards,” and squabs are “plounce.”

fare

Swords of Lastwall lachlain